Nature Institute logo: two trees

The Nature Institute
20 May Hill Road
Ghent, New York 12075

Tel: (518) 672-0116
Fax: (518) 672-4270
Email:
   info@natureinstitute.org

For directions to the
Institute, click here.

This website copyright
2004-2016 by
The Nature Institute.

Return to In Context Main Page

In Context #11 (Spring, 2004)

The Trouble with Genetically Modified Crops
by Craig Holdrege

The plight of Percy Schmeiser, a Canadian organic farmer sued by Monsanto after genetically modified Canola plants appeared on his farm, poses many issues for farmers and for the integrity of our food supply. But one county (in California) has now chosen to ban genetically modified crops.

Sidebar: Widespread GM Contamination of Seed Supply

A recent study shows a disturbing pattern of contamination of seed being sold through standard marketing channels. Genetically modified constructs are appearing where they ought not to be.

Genesis of the Gene

A review by Stephen L. Talbott of Lenny Moss’ What Genes Can’t Do. Moss, a cell biologist and philosopher, discovered that the gene is at least as much a function of its cellular context as the cell is a function of its genes.

Feature Articles

From Wonder Bread to GM Lettuce
by Craig Holdrege

No food is a mere aggregation of individual, isolated elements. The living organism has a unity of its own reflected in how all its parts relate to each other. These relationships not only make the organism what it is, but they also make the organism into the food it is. So, too, in the human and social realm: it makes no sense to treat our food as a collection of isolated ingredients, ignoring the integrity of the processes by which the food is grown, transported, processed, and sold.

Science and the Child
by Stephen L. Talbott

The sophisticated, value-neutral, hard-headed world of science supposedly lies at the opposite extreme from the naive, value-centered, imaginative world of the child. In reality, there is only one world, and upon closer inspection it begins to look rather child-like.

- Back to Top

About Us | Become a Friend | Bookstore | Contact Us | Search | Calendar of Events | Our Education Programs | Our Publications | Content Areas | Browse by Author | Resources and Links | Home